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San Diego Whale Watching Season Starts December 13th

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  • Amazing facts about blue whales | OneKind

     One Kind : Amazing facts about blue whales such as behaviour, intelligence, physical, diet, life span, size, weight, habitat, range and latin name.


  • Blue Whales, Blue Whale Pictures, Blue Whale Facts …

    National Geographic Society

    Learn all you wanted to know about blue whales with pictures, videos, photos, facts, and news from National Geographic.

  • Blue Whale Facts – Soft Schools

     Blue whale is the largest animal on the planet. It can be found in all oceans of the world. They usually spend the summer in arctic water and migrate to southern …

  • Blue whale – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Blue whales were abundant in nearly all the oceans on Earth until the beginning of the twentieth century. …… The Guinness Book of Animal Facts and Feats. p.

  • Blue Whale Facts

    The blue whale (scientifically referred to as balaenoptera musculus) is a large marine mammal that is part of the baleen whale (mysticeti) suborder and is the …

  • Fun Facts About Blue Whales – Blue Whale Project – Sites

    Yes, blue whales are the largest animal that ever lived – larger than the largest dinosaur! Biggest blue whale ever recorded was ~110 feet (33m). Our whale is …

  • WWF – Blue whale

    World Wide Fund for Nature

    The blue whale is the largest animal ever known to have existed. … Key FactsBlue whales have row of 300- 400 baleen plates on each side of the mouth,  ..


Fast Facts about Blue Whales

  • The blue whale is bigger than 25 elephants.
  • It is almost twice the size in weight of most large dinosuars, including theArgentinosaurus andApatosaurus (once mistakenly know as the Brontosaurus).
  • It consumes about 40 million individual euphausiids daily, amounting to a total weight of 3,600 kg.
  • The blue whale’s tongue alone weights around 2.7 tonnes.
  • A young blue whale grows at a rate of 90 kg per day.Bluefluke

Scientists Track Gray Whale Migration From Big Sur Bluffs After 7 Year Hiatus

Taken from “A Winter’s Watch: Scientists Track Whale Migration From Big Sur Bluffs” from the Montery Herald website

The census in 2011 estimated the current population to be about 21,000, a number that’s been relatively stable for the past 10 years.

“This year, we want to see a stable population or one that’s slightly increasing,” Weller said.

That would be good news for whale watchers, too. Richard Ternullo, the owner of Monterey Bay Whale Watch, said business has been solid so far this season.

“The weather’s been good, so people have been out,” Ternullo said. “It seems like a pretty normal migration in terms of the number. Maybe it was a little bit early as far as when we started seeing the migrants.”

Detecting shifts in when the whales start arriving — and especially when the peak number goes by — is a secondary goal of the census.

“Every given year it might shift a little bit forward, or a little backward,” Weller said.

Whale biologists are also interested in whether the declining levels of Arctic sea ice will affect migration patterns.

“The receding ice is not necessarily a negative thing in the gray whale case,” Weller said.

That’s because it opens up new habitats, and no one is sure what effects this will have on gray whale behavior. But the biggest mystery is still why the whales migrate at all.

“Some people believe they migrate away from areas where calves are in danger,” Weller said, adding that this is his favored explanation.

Another explanation holds that the demands of giving birth require the whale moms to be in warmer waters for energetic reasons. These questions will require many future studies to decide.

For now, this year’s count is still up in the air.

“We won’t really know until the whole thing is over,” Weller said


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