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Gray Whale Watching Season begins December 8

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San Diego Bay’s Reptilian Residents

green sea turtle

Green Sea Turtle with satellite tag

Did you know Green Sea Turtles (Chelonia mydas) are native to San Diego? These aquatic herbivores (vegetarians) are attracted to the bay’s warm, shallow waters where they can find food in the abundant eelgrass beds. The turtles feed on seaweed and sea grasses along the Southern California coast and migrate to nesting grounds off the Pacific Coast of Mexico.

Recently several green turtles have been spotted at several locations within the San Diego Harbor including by the Hornblower boat docks. These include the turtle pictured above, which was released along with several others with satellite tags offshore of San Diego. These green turtles are part of a joint sea turtle tracking study involving researchers from SeaWorld and National Marine Fisheries Service.

 

Blue Whale Watching Season is about to Begin!

HORNBLOWER’S BLUE WHALE WATCHING ADVENTURES GIVE PASSENGERS THE THRILL OF A LIFETIME Starting June 30th, Whale Watching Tours Depart Friday to Monday at 9am From Downtown San Diego   San Diego, California (June 1, 2017) – Starting June 30th, Hornblower Cruises & Events will once again offer Blue Whale Watching to San Diego visitors and…

The Peculiar Mola Mola

MOLAMOLA

When you think of a fish, the Mola mola is probably not what you’d picture. This strange fish has a somewhat circular body that is flattened from side-to-side with no caudal (tail) fin and rudder-like top and bottom fins, which the fish flaps to swim. Mola molas are found in temperate (cool) and tropical waters worldwide and are commonly seen on Hornblower Whale Watching trips off San Diego. It is also called the ocean sunfish due to its habit of lying on its side at the water’s surface. This bizarre behavior may help a mola mola warm up after a deep dive or be done to invite seabirds to peck parasites off its skin. The mola mola also often basks near kelp paddies or in kelp beds to allow small fishes to pick off parasites.

The mola mola is the world’s heaviest bony fish, reaching a maximum weight of 5,000 pounds (2,250 kg)! It remarkably attains this great weight on a diet tons of jellyfish, but also occasionally eats small fishes, squid and other gelatinous creatures such as salps. Although mola mola are not endangered, they often eat floating plastic bags—mistaking them for jellyfish prey—which can choke or suffocate these fish. You can help mola molas by making sure your trash (including plastic bags) is always properly disposed of so that it can’t reach the sea. Even better, bring and use reusable bags whenever you are grocery shopping. By taking these simple steps, you can help keep the oceans healthy for mola molas and other ocean wildlife.